RETURNED MIGRANT WORKERS’ ORGANIZATION AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: A CASE STUDY OF INDRAMAYU, INDONESIA

  • Khairu Roojiqien Sobandi Department of Political Science, University of Jenderal Soedirman
Keywords: Returned Migrant Workers’ Organization, Social Remittances, Migration and Development, Indramayu Regency

Abstract

Studies of international migration have highlighted the positive impacts it can have on the development of community of origin. However, it remains unclear exactly how international migration leads to positive development. In this article, I argue that the creation of returned migrants’ organizations, as a form of political mobilization, contribute to positive development in the community of origin, not only economically but also socio-politically. This article examines the role of returned migrant workers’ village organizations in developing their community of origin, using the case study of Indramayu regency, West Java, Indonesia, as it has remained the largest sending area of Indonesian overseas migrant workers for years. The findings of this study highlight the importance of the political dimensions of returned migrants’ village organization’s work in developing the community of origin, including community development, policy making, and constructing communal village projects.

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Author Biography

Khairu Roojiqien Sobandi, Department of Political Science, University of Jenderal Soedirman

Department of Political Science, University of Jenderal Soedirman, Central Java, Indonesia and Department of Political Science, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.

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Published
2020-01-30
How to Cite
Sobandi, K. R. (2020). RETURNED MIGRANT WORKERS’ ORGANIZATION AND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT: A CASE STUDY OF INDRAMAYU, INDONESIA. Social Science Asia, 5(4), 1-17. Retrieved from https://socialscienceasia.nrct.go.th/index.php/SSAsia/article/view/173
Section
Research Article